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Help! My Engine Won’t Start!

When a marine engine whether it’s an inboard or outboard won’t start there is a procedure for testing to find the problem. These test procedures will work with most gas powered engines. A few tools needed for testing the marine engine includes hand tools that would include hand wrenches, screwdrivers, and a socket set with misc. extensions. There is also a need for some special tools a test light or a volt/ohm meter, a compression gauge, a remote start, and a spark tester. A rule of thumb for testing engines is that you need compression, spark, and fuel to run, and should be tested in that sequence. Read more

Marine Battery Isolator

The battery isolator is very similiar to the battery switch in that it can charge two batteries and yet isolate the two.The difference being that there is no manual switch to operate using the battery isolator, its all automatic. There is pros and cons to both setups, with the battery isolator you have only one battery for the engine and one auxiliary battery for normally cabin use. Both batteries are charged by the engine and when one battery is discharged it will not drain the other. An isolator is basically a diode, a one way path through a circuit. There are different setups as with the battery switch such as dual engine installations and isolators that will charge more than two batteries. The battery switch can be manually switched between batteries to charge or start off from one or both batteries, where the isolator cannot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Choosing the Correct Propeller

Choosing the correct prop for your boat can mean the difference between a well performing motor, and an engine that is low on power which is lugging or over revving. A lugging or over revving engine will eventually fail to engine damage. The prop must be for the proper application, be it an outboard, inboard, or I/O, a noticeable differences being the hub design, hub diameter, and spline.

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Fuel Lines

This is a mercury outboard fuel line coming apart from the inside, which will clog fuel pumps and carburetors.

Fuel lines that are showing deterioration on the outside are deteriorated on the inside too. Marine grade line holds up a little better than regular stuff, but too many variables. One big thing is if your premix 2 stroke, or just straight gas running through the lines. If you have any type of rubber debris in your filter or carb bowls its probably time already. Premix in the lines can swell inner liner and cause flow issues.

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Electrical Basics

Making a good electrical repair or correctly installing electronics on your boat can make a huge difference in the longevity of the project. The correct tools and proper materials will make for a quick and long lasting repair or install. With a good test light tracking an electrical problem is quite easy whether its in the bilge, under the helm or within the gunnels. When installing a new depth sounder, marine radio, bilge pump, horn, radar, ect with all the right stuff the job will be easy. Tools and materials needed for most repairs and installations include, basic hand tools, a 1/2 inch drill, 3/8 cordless drill, a set of drill bits, assorted hole saws, crimper/wire stripping tool, double stranded wire, assorted connectors, electrical tape, fuses, fuse holders, silicone caulk, test light, soldering gun, solder paste, tie straps, misc. stainless screws, side cutters and shrink tube. Depending on the project one or more of these will be needed.All electrical and electronics require that they be fused or go through a breaker, also the proper gauge wire will be needed. A good battery ground is a must to ensure good current flow and help reduce static noise on the radio equipment.

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